Hints, Tips and Solutions

 

Volume 11, Number 3, March 2000

 

Q: Usually, when I want to change the display of a drawing in the Drawing window, I select the Window pull-down menu in order to zoom in/out, pan, and fit. Sometimes, if I need to do these operations, this way is not convenient. What is a more effective way to control displaying?

A: Scholar supports a number of effective ways to control displaying.

The simplest way is to use the toolbar which in the current Scholar version, is included in both schematic drawing and symbol drawing windows. Zoom In/Out and Fit functions are placed in toolbar (Figure 1). You can press these buttons as many times as needed to call zoom in/out and fit.

Figure 1. Toolbar.

 

The disadvantage of these functions is that zooming is carried out according to a zoom factor .

If you prefer to use the mouse to zoom in/out of a particular part of your drawing, the best way is to use Change View functionality. Change View button is also present in the toolbar (Figure 2).



Figure 2. Change View button.

 

Changing View functions makes it possible to perform complex window commands using a combination of the Shift key and mouse button.

The default mouse buttons while in the Change View command are:

  • Zoom In - MB1 drag
  • Zoom Out - MB3 drag
  • Fit - Shift/MB1 click
  • Pan - Shift/MB3 click
  • End Change View mode - MB2 click

It is recommended to use Change View mode commands while performing some other commands such as wiring. If Change View mode is set up while in the wire mode, any windowing operation can be performed. Control is returned to the Wire mode when the window operation is completed by an MB2 click.

If you are in the Select mode, it is also convenient to select Change View using the pop-up menu that is shown in Figure 3. This menu is opened by pressing MB3 in the empty part of a drawing window. Change View button changes mode from Select to change views. So, you can use Zoom, Pan, Fit, and other commands as many times as needed.

Figure 3. Pop-up menu.

 

Q: How to create a nonrectangular array of symbols and macroboxes?

Scholar makes it possible to create and represent an array as the real array of symbols. That may be either a rectangular array or not. You can use Edit=>Arrayed Copy menu item in the following scenarios:

  1. Place the symbol to be arrayed. It is considered as a starting element of the symbol instances matrix. Suppose the AND2 symbol is placed in the starting position of an array.

  2. Select the Edit=>Arrayed Copy menu item. Arrayed Copy dialog box appears (Figure 4). MB1 click on Constraint button to set up it OFF.


    Figure 4. Arrayed Copy dialog box.



  3. In the Arrayed Copy dialog box, enter the desired number of copies and press Enter.

  4. Select the starting instance and MB1 click in it. Then, move the copy up and right, and MB1 click. The copies are placed with the same Y and X offsets as specified between the first copy and the original symbol (Figure 5).



    Figure 5. Creation of a non-rectagular array of symbol.



  5. Select the entire set of these symbol instances. Enter the desired number of copies in the other direction.

  6. MB1 click on the selected set of symbol instances. Their copies appear attached to the pointer.

  7. Move these copies and click MB1 to place them. The set of copies will be placed with the same offset specified between the first copy set and the next one (Figure 6).
  8.  


    Figure 6. Creation of a set of a non-rectangular array of symbol.

  9. Press MB2 to end the Arrayed Copy command.

The following scenarios can be used to create an array of macroboxes:

  1. Create the macrobox definition or definition/ instance to be arrayed.

  2. Create macrobox instance. Specify pound signs as part of the instance name (for example, MB;INST##). The current macrobox instance is considered as the starting position of the macrobox instances array.

  3. Select Edit=>Arrayed Copy menu item. An Arrayed Copy dialog box appears. Enter the desired number of copies. Enter the desired start value that will be formed automatically in the name of first macrobox. Enter the desired increment value that will be used for automatic forming of macrobox names.

  4. Select the starting macrobox instance, MB1 click in it. Then, move the copy, and MB1 click. The copies are placed with the same offsets as specified between the first copy and the original macrobox. The first pound sign in each of the copies is replaced with the appropriate number.

  5. Select this entire set of macrobox instances. Enter the desired number of copies in the other array direction. Enter the desired number of copies, start value, and increment value.

  6. MB1 click on the selected set of macrobox instances. Their copies appear attached to the pointer.

  7. Move the copies and click MB1 to place them. The copies will be placed with the same offset specified between the first copy set and the first set of macrobox instances. The second pound sign in each of the copies is replaced with the appropriate number.

  8. Press MB2 to end the Arrayed Copy command.

 

 

Call for Questions

If you have hints, tips, solutions or questions to contribute, please contact our Applications and Support Department
Phone: (408) 567-1000 Fax: (408) 496-6080
email: support@silvaco.com